Relevant Resources

Relevant Resources

 

Our aim is to share the latest youth physical activity research with the field.

Recommend a Resource

If you have a new paper, report, toolkit, or other relevant resource that you would like to recommend for inclusion to the PARC resource list, please contact the PARC Coordinating Center.

Below you will find the latest resources, organized by PARC topic area, to help inform your work to make physical activity an everyday experience for all children.

Infant, child, adolescent development (including School settings)

  • Armstrong S, et al. Association of physical activity with income, race/ethnicity, and sex among adolescents and youth adults in the United States: findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2016. JAMA Pediatr. 2018.
  • Brazendale K, et al. Understanding differences between summer vs. school obesogenic behaviors of children: the structured days hypothesis. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017; 14:100.
  • Brazendale K, et al. Children’s moderate to vigorous physical activity attending summer day camps. Am J Prev Med. 2017; 53(1):78-84.
  • Brusseau TA, et al. The effect of a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program on physical activity and health-related fitness in children from low-income families. J Phys Act Health. 2016; 13(8):888-894.
  • Cannon JS, et al. Investing early: taking stock of outcomes and economic returns from early childhood programs. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation, 2017.
  • Curry WB, et al. Newham’s Every Child a Sports Person (NECaSP): a summative process evaluation of a school- and community-based intervention in East London, United Kingdom. J Phys Act Health. 2016; 13(10):1124-1131.
  • Hesketh KR, et al. Determinants of change in physical activity in children 0-6 years of age: a systematic review of quantitative literature. Sports Med. 2017; 47(7): 1349-1374.
  • Howie EK, et al. Acute effects of classroom exercise breaks on executive function and math performance: a dose-response study. Res Q Exerc Sport. 2015; 86(3):217-224.
  • Jago, R, et al. Association of parents’ and children’s physical activity and sedentary time in Year 4 (8-9) and change between Year 1 (5-6) and Year 4: a longitudinal study. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017; 14:110.
  • Kahan D, et al. Energy expenditure estimates during school physical education: potential vs. reality? Prev Med. 2017; 95:82-88.
  • Kramer MR, et al. Geography of adolescent obesity in the U.S., 2007-2011. Am J Prev Med. 2016; 51(6):898-909.
  • Moir C, et al. Early intervention to encourage physical activity in infants and toddlers: a randomized controlled trial. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2016; 48(12):2446-2453.
  • Nanney MS, et al. School obesity prevention policies and practices in Minnesota and student outcomes: a longitudinal cohort study. Am J Prev Med. 2016; 51(5):656-663.
  • Pan L, et al. Trends in severe obesity among children aged 2 to 4 years enrolled in Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children from 2000 to 2014. JAMA Pediatr. 2018; doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.4301.
  • Sallis JF. The value of the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research: past, present, and future. Am J Prev Med. 2018; 54(3):475-477.
  • Von Hippel PT, et al. From kindergarten through second grade, U.S. children’s obesity prevalence grows only during summer vacations. Obesity. 2016; 24(11):2296-2300.

Transportation, land use, urban design, communities setting

Parks, recreation, trails, open space

  • McCarthy SM, et al. Examining sociodemographic differences in playground availability and quality and associations with childhood obesity. Child Obes. 2017; 13(4):324-331.
  • Winig BD, et al. A public health law analysis of shared use agreements in Los Angeles County, 2010-2014. Calif J Health Promot. 2017; 15(2):69-74.